The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds 3DS Review

The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds is the newest addition to the long-running Legend of Zelda series by Nintendo. It is the first original 3DS Zelda title, and is the sequel to the SNES hit, The Legend of Zelda: Link to the Past. This game follows a very similar story-line and hub world to that of its predecessor.

Gameplay: Link Between Worlds picks up right where Link to the Past left off. The hero wakes up in his home and with a slower introduction than LTTP, the player collects the three pendants, then enters Lorule (the dark incarnation of Hyrule) to find the paintings of the seven sages in order to fight the antagonist, a Ganon incarnation named Yuga. The game plays very much like LTTP, with the same relative main world but with all new dungeons. Link (or whatever you choose to name your hero), along with items that he can either rent or purchase from a support character named Ravio, has gained the power to move in and out of walls to get from place to place. It holds the same overhead gameplay of LTTP and retains its flow.

Graphics: Graphically, Link Between Worlds is very well designed. It combines the 3D models of the newer console games with the style of Link to The Past. The drawings of the paintings for both Link and the Sages has a very Wind Waker-esque style and the 3D mode of the game stands out during cut-scenes but falls rather flat during gameplay due to the amount of motion (which is rather common with 3DS games).

Online Capabilities: Nintendo’s StreetPass feature plays a part in this game but so far, I have not come upon any use for it so far. The player has an apple tree next to their home (converted into Ravio`s shop) that boasts a sign labelled “StreetPass”.

EDIT (December 1st, 2013): Upon exploration, I found out that through StreetPass, the user can send a “Dark Link” equipped with any two items and a choice of equipment that allows players to fight them to earn rupees to gain a “bounty”. This provides the player a fun diversion/after story minigame.

Replay Value:

As an avid fan of the Zelda series, my favourite being 2003’s Wind Waker, I always do find a draw in replaying the game and adding small conditions such as no-fairys, no-death run or playing without collecting things like armor or heart containers. For Link Between Worlds, which I found had an easy to clear to story requires the player to challenge themselves to replay with these conditions. As well, you can collect all the heart pieces, the ores to power up the Master Sword or generally explore all the nooks and crannies of the overworld and dungeons.

EDIT (December 1st, 2013): As well, the StreetPass features of LBW allow for the player to participate in a deathmatch of sorts and provides some good fun after the game is complete.

Final Verdict:

While a short game that rehashed the exact same main world, Link Between Worlds has a unique charm with its use of the wall travel and the ability to rent all the items and do the dungeons in any order. Each dungeon feels like it takes roughly fifteen to thirty minutes to complete and leaves a sour taste in my mouth as I feel like it was very easy to blow through. Not the best Zelda title I’ve played, but the sheer nostalgia it creates by mimicking Link to The Past’s style makes me feel a slight draw to it. I recommend this title to casual gamers more than hardcore gamers due to its easier difficulty, but if you are a Zelda fan, don’t miss out on this gem.

Official Trailer:

Overall Score: 8/10

RGN Rating: Silver Game

Developers: Nintendo EAD 3 / Monolith Studios

Publisher: Nintendo

Available On: Nintendo 3Ds / Nintendo 2DS

Review Copy Info: This game was purchased by RealGamerNewz for the purpose of this review.

(Bonus: Matt’s Score Breakdown)

  • Gameplay- 25/30
  • Graphics- 4/5
  • Online Capabilities – 4/5
  • Replay Value- 7/10
  • Overall- 40/50, an 80%.

Editor’s Note: RealGamerNewZ has moved web servers, some older posts can no longer be commented on and have been preserved without their images. Thank you for your understanding in this matter. This article was written by Matthew Dokurno on 20131130 and was last modified on 20131202 .